BOB DYLAN FOOLED THE WORLD FOR DECADES CLAIMING TO HAVE WRITTEN MANY OF THE MELODIES TO HIS HIT SONGS WHEN IN FACT MOST OF THE MELODIES WERE FROM PREEXISTING SONGS THAT HE DID NOT WRITE. IN A LAST NAIL IN THE COFFIN SCENARIO JAMES DAMIANO'S MOVIE "ELEVEN YEARS" DRAWS THE STRAW THAT BREAKS THE CAMEL’S BACK, RIVETS BOB DYLAN TO HIS SECRET PAST OF PLAGIARISM AND REWRITES MUSICAL HISTORY"......THE NEW YORK TIMES 

ELEVEN YEARS BOB DYLAN 'S STEALING OF JAMES DAMIANO 'S SONGS 

MOVIE LINK PART 1

 

MOVIE LINK PART 2

 

keith9richards@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 NARRATED BY CHRISTINE BOUTSIKARIS

 

 

 

 


DYLAN'S FREEWHEELIN ALBUM WAS REVIEWED BY Janet Maslin OF THE NEW YORK TIMES IN THE 60'S Ms. Maslin CALLED DYLAN A PLAGIARIST

"In barely over a year, a young plagiarist had been reborn as a songwriter of substance, and his first album of fully realized original material got the 1960s off their musical starting block"

Quoted from Cardozo Law Journal:

Additionally, ruling that a qualified reporter’s privilege existed regarding an interview Dylan gave where he claimed he had writer’s block demonstrates the willingness of courts to protect the big name musician instead of the original composer, thereby endorsing a minor form of plagiarism.

However, protecting Bob Dylan in this one instance may differ in a case where the musician is not well known or does not have a reputation of borrowing from other musicians since the beginning of his career. Indeed, Bob Dylan disclaiming he has writer’s block can give rise to an inference for a reasonable jury to believe that it is more likely that he copied Damiano’s song if the jury heard that he had writer’s block, as compared to the jury not hearing that he had writer’s block.

Therefore, by deeming the requested evidence in the motion to compel irrelevant, it is not clear whether or not Bob Dylan did in fact plagiarize James Damiano’s song or was merely influenced by his music. Hence, if Damiano’s musicologists theory had been presented to the court and was believed as true, it is very possible that Bob Dylan plagiarized James Damiano’s song.

On the other hand, if a contrary theory was presented, one that does not involve the Schenker analysis, it is possible that Bob Dylan was only influenced by Damiano’s song and used that influence to write Dignity, not to copy Steel Guitars as his own.

Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether the court endorsed Bob Dylan’s potential plagiarism because of whom he was or if the court was willing to turn a blind eye to the alleged plagiarism. This court’s behavior further demonstrates how a court tolerating the use of another’s song may give an incentive to plagiarize.

If a court is willing to dismiss a motion to compel discovery that could prove plagiarism, a court may very well do the same for another musician, even if he or she is not as well known as Bob Dylan.

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